Input welcome on Cities Performance Framework interim report

Release Date: 
20 July 2017
Media release

Assistant Minister for Cities and Digital Transformation Angus Taylor has invited public comment on the National Cities Performance Framework Interim Report, released today.

“The National Cities Performance Framework is a first for Australia,” Assistant Minister Taylor said.

“The Australian Government’s Smart Cities Plan aims to create the foundations for success across all cities and regional centres. Delivering on this commitment starts with common goals, agreed across governments, and an ability to measure their delivery over time. If we can’t measure it, we can’t improve it.”

Feedback can be provided on the Interim Report until 18 August 2017 using the online feedback form available at https://cities.dpmc.gov.au/performance-framework.

When the framework is complete by late 2017, information will be easily accessible in one online location, in the form of an indicator dashboard supported by the DTA (Digital Transformation Agency) and will provide people with baseline information about their city across a range of social, economic and environmental indicators.

The Performance Framework will be a living resource that will expand and improve over time. Future updates will draw on resources made available through the Australian Government’s open data initiatives, including data.gov.au and NationalMap.

The Framework is designed to support a collaborative and evidence-based approach across governments.

Users will be able to understand a city’s narrative, dynamics and emerging trends. The Framework will also enable the public to see how cities are performing.

The Australian Government has consulted extensively through a variety of forums in developing the Performance Framework. This has included engagement with state, territory and local government counterparts, as well as affiliated government and Commonwealth bodies including the CSIRO, the Digital Transformation Agency and Infrastructure Australia. The Government also consulted a range of private sector and not-for-profit groups, experts and academics.